Author: Denise Roberts

Kurt C. Peterson, Publisher It was invigorating to see so many of you here in Tucson at the 2015 WQA Mid-Year Leadership Conference at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort in the Santa Catalina foothills overlooking the city. Before getting down to business, some attendees had a bit of fun: a cowboy breakfast, a jeep tour through the desert, a visit to historic San Xavier del Bac mission and the annual golf benefit for the Water Quality Research Foundation (WQRF). The foundation exceeded its goal for the year, raising $2.8 million to fund industry research. This is an exciting time for the…

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By George Dziura You’re in the water treatment business because it’s profitable and adding specialized POU equipment can increase those profits. First, however, you need to develop a business plan and sound operating procedures. Determine your target customer. Then, select equipment based on your customers and their specific geographic locations. Tightly grouped customers help keep cost down and reduce service response time. Get detailed information from equipment representatives that includes initial cost per unit, time allotted to install the units and the level of monthly, quarterly, semiannual or annual service you’ll provide. Add in cost of possible parts that need…

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By David H. Martin The acceleration of change in marketing has been relentless in the last decade. Water treatment dealers have seen the demise of Yellow Pages as a leading source of business leads. Newspaper ads have shrunk in size and frequency. Time shifting of TV broadcasts has enabled viewers to speed past commercials. And in recent times, we have been told that even customers’ new media habits have shifted. But not so fast! How customers want to communicate A new survey by Marketing Sherpa lets us compare customer preferences for communications. In short, 2,057 American adults were asked about…

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By Kelly A. Reynolds, MSPH, PhD August rains sent a reminder to Detroit, MI residents regarding the dangers of sanitary sewer overflows as nearly 10 billion gallons of raw, untreated sewage seeped into the city’s lakes and rivers.1 Local beaches and drinking water supplies were suspected of being tainted. These events are not unique to Detroit—every community is vulnerable to the possibility of raw sewage exposures from overflows, backflows, spills or other types of discharges of sanitary sewer systems into the environment. Each year, these events impair drinking and recreational water supplies, resulting in significant public health risks. What are…

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By Denise M. Roberts Steve’s Pumps and Well Drilling, Inc. 711-715 Sears Road PO Box 249 Janesville, CA 96114 Phone: (530) 253-3601 Fax: (530) 253-2881 http://yourh2opro.com steve@yourh2opro.com Employees: 10 Steve’s Pumps and Well Drilling, Inc. was founded by Steve and TeriLynn Bejcek in 1990. He was raised in the Susanville, CA area and started working for a local driller at the young age of 16. When Bejcek was 18, a local farmer offered to give him a drill rig in exchange for an irrigation well. At 25, he decided to start his own pump service business. Bejcek taught himself…

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By Rick Andrew Reduction of arsenic in well water is one of the most frequent types of inquiries to NSF’s Consumer Affairs office. It is always one of the top 5 most frequently inquired about contaminants, right up there with lead, hardness, Cryptosporidium and disinfectants (chlorine and chloramines). Fortunately, private well owners have many options when it comes to treatment of well water contaminated with arsenic. The NSF/ANSI Drinking Water Treatment Unit (DWTU) standards include requirements for claims of arsenic reduction for active media systems under NSF/ANSI 53, POU RO systems under NSF/ANSI 58 and distillation systems under NSF/ANSI 62.…

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By Stephen Wiman, PhD Figure 1. Map of study area Introduction Arsenic’s reputation for toxicity precedes it and the presence of elevated arsenic in well water gets the attention of customers. Inorganic arsenic is classified by US EPA as a human carcinogen and arsenic is at the top of the ATSDR’s Priority List of Hazardous Substances (2013). The list is not a ranking of the most toxic substances, but rather a prioritization of substances based on a combination of their frequency, toxicity and potential for human exposure. But advising customers how to remediate arsenic in well water is more problematic…

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By  Lee D. Wilson, PhD Abstract This article presents an overview of chitosan results from the literature that deal mostly with the adsorptive uptake of inorganic arsenic species. Biopolymers such as chitosan and its modified forms represent a suitable alternative to conventional adsorbents because of their abundance, low cost and synthetic versatility. Chitosan-adsorbent materials are anticipated to play an ever increasingly important role in adsorption technology for applications related to contaminant remediation or chemical separations. The future demand for improved adsorbent materials with good adsorption properties and molecular selectivity is anticipated due to the uncontrolled release of contaminants into the…

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By Kelly A. Reynolds, MSPH, PhD At the time of this writing, the first Ebola patient in the US, Thomas Eric Duncan, has died in Dallas, TX and a healthcare worker who cared for him has developed a fever and since tested positive for the virus.1 This is the first known case of Ebola transmitted in the US. Although the healthcare worker reportedly wore full protective gear when caring for Duncan, she may have still acquired Ebola. While transmission through the environment is thought to be rare, the possibility does exist and brings into question how we can better prepare…

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By PWQA staff The theme of the Pacific Water Quality Association’s 57th Convention and Trade Show in October again this year was sustainability. Nothing could be more timely and appropriate than to be well informed on where we are, where we are going and how we are going to get there, as it applies to water usage and conservation in times of drought. “Sustainability is the art of knowing what to do today in order to survive tomorrow.” Approximately 400 attendees, 61 exhibitors and three VIPs (Senator Joel Anderson, Alex Armedariz of Assemblyman Rocky Chavez’s office and Gail Ramer from…

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