Crane Environmental of Stamford, Conn., a company created by the merger of Cochrane Inc. and Environmental Products, received the Internatinoal Bottled Water Association’s Aqua award for best website at the organization’s October show. ?

HALOX Technologies Corp. has announced its updated website. The company develops, manufactures and commercializes point-of-use equipment to make chlorine dioxide, a safe microbiocide. ?

Zenon Environmental Inc. has signed a licensing agreement with VA TECH WABAG, one of Europe’s leading water engineering companies. The licensing agreement gives VA TECH access to Zenon’s ZeeWeed® membrane-based water filtration technology. ?

Atlanta-based NORIT Americas Inc. increased pricing for bituminous coal activated carbons effective Jan. 1. Prices for washed bituminous coal carbons will increase 3 cents a pound and prices for unwashed bituminous coal carbons will increase by 2 cents a pound. ?

A process development team from International Hydronics of Rocky Hill, N.J., has been awarded a joint patent with Xerox Corp. Patent #6,090,290 covers a process for the removal, recovery and reuse of selenium from a process waste stream. ?

Aqua Vie Beverage Corp. said Kehe Food Distributors Inc. of Romeoville, Ill., will distribute Aqua Vie throughout the Midwest. ?

The National Ground Water Association has published the second edition of the book The Hidden Sea: Ground Water, Springs, and Wells by Francis Chapelle. Released in late October, it tells the story of human interaction with groundwater throughout history. ?

The Dow Liquid Separations Business has announced a global 5 percent increase for its 8-inch FILMTEC® Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration membranes. The increase is effective Jan. 1. ?

In the fourth quarter ending Aug. 31, 2000, Trojan Technologies Inc. reported a net profit of $27,000 compared to a loss of $2.9 million for the same period in the prior year. For the fiscal year, the company reported a net loss of $7.7 million compared with a net loss of $3.3 million in 1999. ?

Vermont Pure Springs, the 10-year-old bottler of Vermont Pure National Spring Water, has merged with Crystal Rock Water Co. of Watertown, Conn., an 86-year-old, third generation family business. ?

AquaClara Bottling & Distribution Inc. has expanded distribution of its AquaClara/FLA USA-brand bottled water to Puerto Rico. The water will be distributed to all General Nutrition Centers on the island. ?

Two publications from the NRAES (Natural Resource, Agriculture and Engineering Service) are available on the quality of drinking water—Private Drinking Water Supplies: Quality, Testing, and Options for Problem Waters and Home Water Treatment. ?

In November, R&D Magazine selected four technologies from Nalco Chemical Co. as among the top 100 innovations for 2000. Products cited were ACT™, Trasar® 3000 Fluorometer Feed Controller with Dose & Diagnose service, High Stress Polymer Program, and Nalco® 98DF063 flocculant. ?

Aqua Solutions Inc. of Jasper, Ga., is the new corporate identity for Solution Consultants Inc., a manufacturer of reagent grade laboratory water purification systems sold worldwide to research, medical, testing, environmental, government and quality control laboratories. The company will continue to manufacture and sell Type I and Type II reagent DI systems and reverse osmosis pretreatment systems. ?

The Dow Liquid Separations Business has announced a global 5 percent increase for its 8-inch FILMTEC® Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration membranes. The increase is effective Jan. 1. ?

In the fourth quarter ending Aug. 31, 2000, Trojan Technologies Inc. reported a net profit of $27,000 compared to a loss of $2.9 million for the same period in th eprior year. For the fiscal year, the company reported a net loss of $7.7 million compared with a net loss of $3.3 million in 1999. ?

Vermont Pure Springs, the 10-year -old bottler of Vermont Pure National Spring Water, has merged with Crystal Rock Water Co. of Watertown, Conn., an 86-year-old, third generation family business. ?

AquaClara Bottling & Distribution Inc. has expanded distribution of its AquaClara/FLA USA-brand bottled water to Puerto Rico. The water will be distributed to all General Nutrition Centers on the island. ?

Two publications from the NRAES (Natural Resource, Agriculture and Engineering Service) are available on the quality of drinking water—Private Drinking Water Supplies: Quality, Testing, and Options for Problem Waters and Home Water Treatment. ?

In November, R&D Magazine selected four technologies from Nalco Chemical Co. as among the top 100 innovations for 2000. Products cited were ACT™, Trasar® 3000 Fluorometer Feeder Controller with Dose & Diagnose service, High Street Polymer Program and Nalco® 98DF063 flocculant. ?

Aqua Solutions Inc. of Jasper, Ga., is the new corporate identity for Solution Consultants Inc., a manufacturer of reagent grade laboratory water purification systems sold worldwide to research, medical, testing, environmental, government and quality control laboratories. The company will continue to manufacture and sell Type I and Type II reagent DI systems and reverse osmosis pretreatment systems. ?


Aquion goes full speed ahead—buys Erie’s valves and controls business
Aquion Partners L.P. of Elk Grove Village, Ill., has announced the acquisition of Erie Manufacturing Company’s Water Treatment Controls enterprise from Erie’s parent company, Invensys p.l.c. The venture has been established as a new and entirely independent Strategic Business Unit (SBU) of Aquion. The company assumes design, manufacture and marketing of Erie valves and timers for the water treatment industry. Invensys will retain the Erie heating-ventilation-air conditioning concern.

Aquion CEO Dave Cole said the Erie purchase is a significant step in Aquion’s acquisition plan. “Our acquisition strategy is three-pronged: accelerated growth of our existing businesses, establishment of distribution in unserved markets and selective acquisition such as bringing Erie on board,” Cole said.

“This acquisition opens new markets and different distribution channels than served by our current products,” Cole added. “We plan to expand the Erie product lines and aggressively advance distribution into unserved international markets.” He said the new product lines will continue to reflect Erie’s 50 years of product innovation for the OEM point-of-entry water treatment market—combined with Aquion’s customer focus and exacting quality standards.

Michael Kopacz, formerly director of international sales with Aquion’s RainSoft division, has been promoted to executive vice president of the new Erie SBU. He will be responsible for global expansion of the Erie product lines. Manufacturing and administrative functions for the Erie line have been moved from Invensys’ facility in Milwaukee to Aquion’s Illinois headquarters.

Osmonics manuals online
The Osmonics Household Water Group of Milwaukee has announced the Autotrol brand control valve owner manuals are available online. The current Autotrol brand control valve manuals include the 255 series, Performa™ series, ReadySoft™ system and Magnum Cv™ controls. Osmonics will be adding past product manuals in the next few months. These manuals will benefit both professional water treatment dealers and end users.

Hague welcomes addition
An additional 44,000 square feet of warehouse space has been completed at the Hague Quality Water International headquarters in Columbus, Ohio. New production lines will be added and current lines will be streamlined. The result will be a more efficient flow of material to meet increasing demand for WaterMax® equipment. Additional loading docks will also help in the production flow. Plus, a new section for finished goods storage will allow the inventory of popular units.

ResinTech buys filter maker
ResinTech Inc. of Cherry Hill, N.J., announced the purchase of Hydro Components, a division of Electro Pure Inc., a Laguna Hills, Calif.-based manufacturer of water purification and fluid filtration equipment. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. Hydro Components manufactures a variety of small water treatment systems and related filtration equipment and cartridges for use in water and wastewater processing and reclamation. ResinTech will move the Hydro Components operations to its Cherry Hill facilities.

Speaking out on arsenic
Joe Harrison, Water Quality Association technical director, explained that home water treatment effectively removes arsenic in a Reuters  article entitled “Arsenic in Tap Water: Know Your Risk.” The article also quoted Erik Olsen, spokesperson for the National Resources Defense Council and Richard Maas, University of North Carolina, as recommending home water treatment. WQA believes media interest in the new USEPA arsenic standard will accelerate as finalization of the maximum contaminant level approaches in late spring.

NSF releases reports
NSF International has released two new certification reports and statements for the ETV Drinking Water Treatment Project. The ClorTec Model MC 100 Sodium Hypochlorite Generation System and the Ionics UF-1-7T Ultrafiltration Membrane System completed testing last year. NSF has also released three reports and statements for the project’s Systems Pilot. The Aquasource North America Ultrafiltration System Model A35, the Hydranautics HYDRACap™ Ultrafiltration Membrane System, and the PCI Membrane Systems Fyne Process Model ROP 1434 with AFC-30 Nanofiltration Membranes completed ETV testing last year. The USEPA and NSF have approved distribution of these reports which are located in their entirety on the NSF and USEPA websites.

Group strikes accord
Some surface water systems would have to inactivate Cryptospo-ridium, and systems that disinfect would alter monitoring to better limit disinfection by-products (DBPs), according to the AWWA’s Mainstream. The measure was reached in an accord in early September by stakeholders in the USEPA’s rule-making effort to strengthen control of microbial contaminants and DBPs.

Norwalk taints FSU-Duke
College football players sick with food poisoning passed the Norwalk virus to the opposing team on the field in the first documented case of its kind in sports, researchers said. Duke University players vomited in the locker room and on the sidelines during a Sept. 19, 1998, game against Florida State University after getting sick from a turkey lunch. The food and waterborne virus—first detected at a Norwalk, Ohio, school in the late 1960s—causes vomiting, stomach cramps and diarrhea, and can be transmitted through casual contact. By the way, Duke lost their lunch and the game, 62-13.

Lead in Philly schools
Testing of drinking water for lead had been conducted at all but one of 298 of Philadelphia’s older school buildings by mid-November. So far, about 20 percent of the nearly 14,000 water outlets sampled have unsafe lead levels. The school district has shut off 594 drinking faucets and water coolers after they were found to have high lead levels, district officials said. Many water outlets that tested high weren’t direct drinking sources. The district has spent $329,000 to provide 4-ounce sealed plastic cups of bottled water to 91 schools awaiting test results.

Calgon receives patent
Pittsburgh-based Calgon Carbon Corp. has been granted a U.S. patent for controlling Cryptosporidium (Crypto) in drinking water using ultraviolet light (UV) light. Prior to Calgon’s breakthrough discovery with Sentinel UV® technology, it was thought that very high doses of UV light were required to kill Crypto. Calgon’s research discovered that low levels of UV could be used to prevent Crypto from replicating. In response, Gail Gerono, Calgon corporate spokesperson, said, “We believe that through our research we achieved a breakthrough that would bring significant benefit to the water treatment industry and the U.S. Patent Office obviously agrees. We want to see UV grow broadly in a win-win relationship with all stakeholders in the water industry.” Calgon employs 1,100 employees with 13 facilities and 12 sales and service centers worldwide.

Radon a school threat
U.S. schools may not be paying enough attention to the risk posed to students by cancer-causing radon gas, scientists at Cornell University said. According to the USEPA, a nationwide survey of radon levels in schools estimates that nearly one in five has at least a schoolroom with a short-term radon level above 4pCi/L (picocuries per liter)—the point at which the USEPA recommends schools take action to reduce the level. The agency estimates more than 70,000 schoolrooms today have high short-term radon levels.

USEPA sets story straight on radon, arsenic standards
There has been no additional delay as far as radon standards by the USEPA, according to Bruce Macler of the agency’s San Francisco office. Macler said in early November that misinformed reports have been circulating for approximately a month that finalization of the rule would again be delayed. As the current standard stands, the maximum contaminant level  for radon in drinking water will be set at 4,000 pCi/L for states or communities that have adopted an approved multi-media mitigation  program, and 300 pCi/L for those that haven’t. He said the finalized version was to be sent to federal regulators sometime in early to mid-November and could be enforced in late December 2000 or early January 2001.

As far as arsenic is concerned, the USEPA appropriations bill signed into law by President Clinton on Oct. 27 revised the agency’s statutory deadline for issuing the final arsenic drinking water standard—pushing it back to June 22, 2001 (one year after the proposal). Presently, the proposed rule calls for reducing the amount of arsenic in drinking water from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 5 ppb.

Pepsi snags Quaker
PepsiCo Inc. has bought Quaker Oats Co. in an early December $13.4 billion stock deal that gives the world’s No. 2 beverage company Quaker’s Gatorade, the crown jewel of sports drinks, and ends more than a month of speculation over who might acquire Quaker. The combined entity is expected to have a market value of more than $80 billion. Carbonated soft drinks—such as Pepsi and Mountain Dew—are still the mainstay of the business, but sales of non-carbonated beverages such as Aquafina bottled water are growing.

Agency investigates study
The Office for Human Research Protections has launched a probe into a study where volunteers are paid $1,000 each in a drinking water study to take pills containing an industrial pollutant found in rocket fuel. The experiment, designed to determine if a pollutant called perchlorate interferes with thyroid glands, will develop data that could influence the setting of national and state drinking water standards, the Los Angeles Times first reported in late November. Perchlorate is frequently found in drinking water. It’s believed to be the first large-scale study to use human volunteers to test a water pollutant. The study is being conducted at Loma Linda (Calif.) University Medical Center and is financed by aerospace giant Lockheed Martin. 

International

Hyder drops case
In October, Hyder decided that it will no longer contest the review of the contract arrangements between Welsh Water and UU Co. Severn Trent Water had commenced legal proceedings over this contract and believed that it breached European and U.K. procurement regulations. Severn said the contract should have been put out to competitive tender.

Brita rules Americas
The Brita Products Co. of Oakland, Calif., a principal subsidiary of The Clorox Co., announced an agreement with Brita GmbH of Germany in November to acquire full control of Brita water filtration products in North and South America. Included in the deal is exclusive use of the Brita trademark, full rights to develop and market new products under the Brita name and all business assets in the region. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Cholera blamed on group
Government officials clashed with the country’s main Muslim opposition party for the third time in October, blaming the group for a cholera outbreak in northeastern Malaysia. Senior Malaysian authorities accused the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party (PAS) of failing to provide clean water supply for the people of northeastern Kelantan state, which the party has ruled since 1990. PAS officials claim the government wants to wreck the party’s reputation by politicizing the outbreak, which has infected 108 people.

New standard in México
México’s Secretary of Health announced a new standard pertaining to residential water filters that became effective Dec. 30. NOM-180-SSA1-1998 states a water filter can claim bactericidal capabilities if it removes 95 percent of mesophilic bacteria and 99.99 percent of coliform bacteria.

Fungi destroying coral
The drought in Africa may be partly to blame for a decline in the Caribbean Sea, according to U.S. Geological Survey scientists. They found coral-damaging fungi in dust blown across the ocean. With the long-term drought in Africa, combined with overgrazing in many areas, the amount of dust carried across the oceans has been increasing and is now estimated at several hundred million tons annually.

Cholera kills 34
Thirty-four people have died of cholera in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal as of mid-November and more than 4,000 are infected with the disease, health authorities said. In all, 5,136 cases have been reported since the outbreak of the disease in mid-August in the country’s most populous province. Health authorities haven’t identified the source of the epidemic, but they suspect it might have originated in neighboring Mozambique, which had an outbreak of the disease after floods hit the country last year.

Top banana meets standards
Chiquita Brands International Inc. said in mid-November that its Latin American banana farms met water quality, employment and other standards established by Rainforest Alliance, an environmental organization. The standards are part of the Better Banana Project, which was started in 1991 by the group. Chiquita officials said the company has spent about $20 million over the past eight years to meet the standards.

Laws spark business
The key European Union (EU) legislation buoying the European market for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) control equipment is Council Directive 1999/13/EC. By April 2001, EU members are instructed to have implemented mandatory laws, regulations and provisions to comply with procedures in the directive. A Frost & Sullivan report points to solvent vapor recovery, replacement sales and new technologies as further factors bolstering demand for VOC control equipment across Europe.

Water to Syria cut back
A torrid summer forced Turkey to cut the water flow to Syria by two-thirds, Turkish officials said in October. A 1987 agreement requires Turkey to release to Syria 17,500 cubic feet of Euphrates water per second from its Ataturk Dam in southeastern Turkey. But Turkey is currently releasing an average of 5,600 cubic feet of water per second from the Euphrates River. 

Walkerton records falsified
Canadian health authorities in December finally declared water safe in Walkerton, Ontario—eight months after the country’s worst outbreak of E. coli bacteria killed seven people and made 2,300 ill. An inquiry began Oct. 16, and pointed to two brothers who falsified records to pacify regulators. Frank Koebel testifed he and brother, Stan, town water utility manager since 1988, delayed reporting contamination for up to a week in May while they added chlorine and flushed the system. The inquiry stated areas near wells need proper treatment to reduce public risk and suggested adequate training plus a system of checks to avoid human error. Ontario spent more than US$7 million repairing and updating Walkerton’s water system, including installing a modern filtration plant.

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