Water Conditioning & Purification Magazine

Let’s get this party started!

By Kurt C. Peterson, Publisher

As I write this, it’s still 2019 and we’re getting ready to close out the year and begin anew. A business can only survive if it is dynamic and willing to make changes when necessary. You probably have already heard about the Vision 20/20 theme of the 2020 WQA Annual Convention & Exposition to be held April 1-3 in Orlando, FL. Perhaps your 20/20 vision for the new year will be inspired by the WQA Boot Camp, maybe by the input of friends and associates. Inspiration in any form should be welcome and helpful to your efforts.

There are a multitude of treatment processes available to overcome the broad range of water quality issues that are becoming more problematic each year. And, all things considered, water scarcity around the globe is also contributing to innovation . Whenever you have a finite amount of anything and need to stretch the boundaries of its useful life, there are challenges to overcome. Klaus Reichardt of Waterless Co., Inc. addresses this in his article about what comes next in the future of water treatment. With the need for new water sources, nothing should be overlooked and any source should be treated appropriate to its usage. Yes, that light at the end of the tunnel can mean progress, not a train wreck headed straight for your business.

Many people in rural America are not able to access water infrastructure and must have private wells and septic systems instead. But what happens when that is financially out of reach? You look to one of the agencies that are working hand-in-hand with drillers, equipment manufacturers, designers and installers to make clean, safe water a reality for everyone. Susan O’Grady of Xylem Corporation presents a recap of a recent project undertaken in Texas to help one such family in need. Overall, the cost effectiveness of small wells versus the cost of installing infrastructure can be eye-opening. Not every location can accommodate a modern infrastructure product so people must have options.

Throughout history, the world has suffered a number of pandemics with catastrophic consequences for entire nations. The loss of populations, productivity, etc., have crippled many an economy in times past. Regardless of all that innovation technology has provided to overcome such crises, one thing that has not been resolved is the distinct possibility of a mass-casualty health crisis, in conjunction with or due to waterborne pathogens. It’s not a lack of know-how, in most cases, but a lack of political will by leaders to put in effect those technologies that would ensure the safety of the world’s water supplies, especially when water is considered the life-blood of our species. Public Health Editor Kelly A. Reynolds, takes an in-depth look at this depressing reality facing the world, if it does not soon deal with these issues adequately.

As we embark on a new year, hoping that success is the hallmark of our efforts, are you making any New Year’s business resolutions? Have you learned anything in the past year that has prompted a change in business tactics? Would you like to share those ideas with others? If so, please contact us so WC&P can present even more tales of success for others to learn from and hopefully inspire further innovation. Until we meet again, be safe and enjoy!

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