Water Conditioning & Purification Magazine

Ask the Expert

Looking for a little education

Question: I am a small dealer of POU/POE systems, and am looking to expand my knowledge in the water business. Aside from the WQA study guides, is there anyplace I may find books, materials, etc., to help in my quest. Thank you.

Robert B. Burke
Retaw Water
Norco, Calif.

Answer: First, I checked with Barnes & Noble and Amazon and came up with the following in the top five for each:

Looking for a little education

Question: I am a small dealer of POU/POE systems, and am looking to expand my knowledge in the water business. Aside from the WQA study guides, is there anyplace I may find books, materials, etc., to help in my quest. Thank you.

Robert B. Burke
Retaw Water
Norco, Calif.

Answer: First, I checked with Barnes & Noble and Amazon and came up with the following in the top five for each:

BarnesandNoble.com

  • Wastewater Engineering: Treatment & Reuse,” 4th Ed., Editors: George Tchobanoglous, et al., Metcalf & Eddy, (McGraw-Hill: March 2002).
  • “What Color Is Your Swimming Pool?” Alan E. Sanderfoot, (Storey Books: May 2003).
  • “Clinical Physiology of Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders,” Burton David Rose, et al. (McGraw-Hill: December 2000).
  • “Civil Engineering Water Treatment and Distribution and Wastewater Treatment,” Kenneth J. Williamson (Oxford University Press: January 2001).
  • “Boiler Operator’s Workbook,” R. Dean Wilson (American Technical Publishers Inc.: April 1995).

Amazon.com

  • “Pumping Station Design,” 2nd Ed., Editor: Robert L. Sanks (Butterworth-Heinemann: February 2001).
  • “Integrated Design and Operation of Wastewater Treatment Facilities,” 2nd Ed., Susumu Kawamura (John Wiley & Sons: September 2000).
  • “Water and Wastewater Calculations Manual,” Shun Dar Lin, et al. (McGraw-Hill: May 2001).
  • “Water Treatment Plant Design,” ASCE/AWWA (McGraw-Hill, October 1997).
  • Wastewater Engineering: Treatment & Reuse,” 4th Ed., Editors: George Tchobanoglous, et al., Metcalf & Eddy, (McGraw-Hill: March 2002).

Mind you, the list could go on indefinitely. I just chose the first five for brevity’s sake.

Then, I recalled that Tall Oaks Publishing Inc., which publishes Ultrapure Journal, under the careful editing hand of Frank Slejko, also puts out a number of technical manuals and books for the water treatment industry. They range from “Ion Exchange Deionization” to “Coagulants & Flocculants.” There are 11 in all including three new ones. You can find details at: www.ultrapurewater. com/Books/products.asp

Other than that, you can check CRC Press (www.crcpress.com/) and Harper Collins (www.harpercollins. co.uk/). Hope that helps.

pH, acidity & additives

Question: Hello, I’m a new water treatment dealer in Southern Ontario and I am concerned about the pH levels of distilled water. Can the acidic levels be raised by additives to this water? Who can I contact about such information? The reason I ask is in reference to the January WC&P’s article on diabetes. Is acidic water dangerous over time to our bodies?

Stephen Parent
Pure Water Source
London, ONT, Canada

Answer: Yes, additives can be added to lower the pH of water, but we consume low pH water all the time. The pH of carbonated beverages is in the neighborhood of 3.5, and fruit juices are also low in pH. Our stomachs contain hydrochloric acid at pHs in the neighborhood of 2, so it’s obvious that our bodies tolerate acidic foods very well. As you’re probably aware, heartburn usually results from too much acidity and products like Tums® are basically alkaline compounds such as calcium carbonate. I might add that the more pure a water is, the closer its pH gets to 7.0—the true pH of ultrapure water. We hope that helps.

 

©2021 EIJ Company LLC, All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy | tucson website design by Arizona Computer Guru